Contemporary resolution for Labour Party conference on trade union rights

The Tories’ Trade Union Bill, severely curtailing workers’ rights, is coming back to Parliament in September. We are calling on Constituency Labour Parties to submit the following contemporary resolution to Labour Party conference.

If you are planning to submit it, please let us know: socialistcampaign@gmail.com

NB The word limit is 250.

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Conference notes that at the start of August trade unions launched a “Kill the Bill” campaign against the Tories’ proposed assault on trade unions and workers’ rights.

Conference notes that, in addition to ending the ability to vote to strike by a straightforward majority, the Trade Union Bill renders strikes ineffective through longer notice periods, criminalisation of picketing, use of agency labour, punitive fines and state interference via the Certification Officer.

Conference notes that on 6 August it was announced that the legislation will attack public sector unions’ ability to organise by compulsorily ending automatic dues check-off arrangements. It also attacks unions’ right to fund a working-class political voice, including the vital link between unions and our party.

Conference believes that workers’ rights, including the right to strike, are essential to the labour movement’s ability to stand up for workers’ interests, and to democracy.

Conference believes that the Tories are blatant hypocrites, requiring 40 percent or more for a strike though their party took office with the support of less than 25 percent of the electorate.

Conference resolves

To work with the unions and campaigning organisations to oppose the Trade Union Bill.
That the next Labour government should repeal these attacks if they pass, repeal all the anti-trade union laws passed by the 1979-1997 Tory governments, and legislate for strong rights to unionise, win recognition and collective bargaining, strike, picket and take solidarity action.
That the party should unambiguously promote trade union membership and workers’ rights.

(246 words)

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